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In the UK verbal and physical aggression towards NHS staff is on the increase

Medical News - Mon, 10/03/2014 - 09:00
VERBAL and physical aggression towards health and social care staff is on the increase. The NHS has reported a rise of 5.8 per cent in reported assaults - up to 63,199 in 2012/13. Now a University of Huddersfield lecturer has called for a programme of research to establish the best methods for dealing with the problem.Various techniques known as "de-escalation" have evolved in order to calm threatening situations.
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The health benefits of seeing the same doctor

Medical News - Mon, 10/03/2014 - 09:00
Patients are more likely to raise a health problem with a doctor they've seen over time and have built-up a relationship with, new research has revealed. The insight comes as an increasing number of patients struggle to see the same GP.Researchers from the University of Bristol will shared their findings with health practitioners and researchers at the recent South West Society for Academic Primary Care (SW SAPC) meeting.
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Shedding new light on marijuana's anxiety relief effects

Medical News - Mon, 10/03/2014 - 09:00
An international group led by Vanderbilt University researchers has found cannabinoid receptors, through which marijuana exerts its effects, in a key emotional hub in the brain involved in regulating anxiety and the flight-or-fight response.This is the first time cannabinoid receptors have been identified in the central nucleus of the amygdala in a mouse model, they report in the current issue of the journal Neuron.The discovery may help explain why marijuana users say they take the drug mainly to reduce anxiety, said Sachin Patel, M.D., Ph.D.
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Improved management of a chronic graft-vs.-host disease complication

Medical News - Mon, 10/03/2014 - 09:00
A simple questionnaire that rates breathing difficulties on a scale of 0 to 3 predicts survival in chronic graft-vs.-host disease, according to a study published in the March issue of Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation.And although a poor score means a higher risk of death, asking a simple question that can spot lung involvement early means that patients can begin treatments to reduce or manage symptoms, said senior author Stephanie Lee, M.D., M.P.H.
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B-cells aggravate autoimmune diseases

Medical News - Mon, 10/03/2014 - 08:00
Scientists in Freiburg may have discovered a fundamental aggravating factor in autoimmune diseases. If B-lymphocytes lack the protein PTP1B, the cells will become hyperactive for stimulatory signals and can thus promote an autoimmune attack. This study offers an additional explanation to how B-cells regulate an immune response.In Germany, approximately 800,000 people suffer from rheumatoid arthritis. In this progressive disease, a person's own immune system attacks and destroys connective tissue. However, the most important factors governing the progress of the disease are still unknown.
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Study helps refine personalized approach to breast cancer diagnosis and treatment

Medical News - Mon, 10/03/2014 - 08:00
A method called molecular subtyping can help doctors better determine which of their breast cancer patients are at high risk of getting breast cancer again, a new study led by the University of South Florida reports. This sophisticated genetic profiling of an individual's specific tumor offers an additional resource to help identify patients who would most benefit from chemotherapy and those who would not.The findings by researchers from USF and other institutions were presented in a scientific poster at the Miami Breast Cancer Conference in Miami Beach, Fla.
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In zebrafish model, common mutation is culprit in acute leukemia relapse

Medical News - Mon, 10/03/2014 - 08:00
Harvard stem cell scientists have identified a mutation in human cases of acute lymphoblastic leukemia that likely drives relapse. The research, published in Cancer Cell, could translate into improved patient care strategies for this particular blood cancer, which typically affects children but is more deadly in adults.In recent years, a trend toward single-cell analysis has shown that individual cells within a tumor are capable of amassing mutations to make them more aggressive and treatment resistant.
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'Good' stem cells defined

Medical News - Mon, 10/03/2014 - 08:00
After more than a decade of incremental - and paradigm shifting, advances in stem cell biology, almost anyone with a basic understanding of life sciences knows that stem cells are the basic form of cell from which all specialized cells, and eventually organs and body parts, derive.But what makes a "good" stem cell, one that can reliably be used in drug development, and for disease study? Researchers have made enormous strides in understanding the process of cellular reprogramming, and how and why stem cells commit to becoming various types of adult cells.
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Common causes of kidney dysfunction after transplantation detected by simple urine test

Medical News - Mon, 10/03/2014 - 08:00
A new noninvasive urine test can distinguish among different causes of acute kidney dysfunction after transplantation. The test, which is described in a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (JASN), may allow patients to avoid invasive kidney biopsies when their transplanted organ is not functioning properly.When creatinine levels are elevated in the blood of a kidney transplant recipient, it is an indication that the transplanted kidney is not functioning well.
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Children whose parents provide less early academic stimulation gain extra benefit from Head Start

Medical News - Mon, 10/03/2014 - 08:00
One year of Head Start can make a bigger difference for children from homes where parents provide less early academic stimulation, such as reading to children, helping them recognize and pronounce letters and words, and helping them count. Showing parents how they can help their children with reading and counting may help, too.Those are the conclusions of a new study by researchers at the University of California, Irvine. The study appears in the journal Child Development.
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Iron deficiency important to assess in children adopted from institutional settings

Medical News - Mon, 10/03/2014 - 08:00
Iron deficiency predicts lower IQ scores and poor higher-order thinking skills in children adopted from institutional settings like orphanages, according to a new longitudinal study.The study analyzed data on 55 children adopted from international institutions, with a focus on nutritional status. Conducted by researchers at the University of Minnesota, the research appears in the journal Child Development.
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Sensory substitution approach enables blind to 'see' bodies with sound

Medical News - Mon, 10/03/2014 - 08:00
People born unable to see are readily capable of learning to perceive the shape of the human body through soundscapes that translate images into sound, according to researchers who report their findings in the Cell Press journal Current Biology. With a little training, soundscapes representing the outlines and silhouettes of bodies cause the brain's visual cortex - and specifically an area dedicated in normally sighted people to processing body shapes - to light up with activity.
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Target identified for shutting down growth of prostate cancer cells

Medical News - Mon, 10/03/2014 - 08:00
Scientists at UT Southwestern Medical Center have identified an important step toward potentially shutting down the growth of prostate cancer cells.Dr. Ralf Kittler, Assistant Professor of Pharmacology, studies ERG, a protein that facilitates the transformation of normal prostate cells into cancer cells. His lab found that an enzyme called USP9X protects ERG from degradation and subsequently found that a molecule called WP1130 can block USP9X and lead to the destruction of ERG."We now have a target that we could potentially exploit to develop a drug for treatment," said Dr.
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Patients and their families lack basic skills and knowledge to manage heart failure successfully

Medical News - Mon, 10/03/2014 - 08:00
Al Brommeland found a true partner in his wife Florence. Through 57 years of marriage they've proved a formidable team, swinging and bowing at square dances, kicking up dust in their clogs, and now in their golden years, taking daily strolls side by side.When Al started experiencing irregular heart rhythm 12 years ago, the couple worked together to stay healthy.
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Work increases resilience among survivors in a town where half the people have PTSD symptoms

Medical News - Mon, 10/03/2014 - 08:00
Though just two of Hirono's 5,418 residents lost their lives in Japan's mega-earthquake and tsunami, a new study shows that the survivors are struggling to keep their sanity.One year after the quake, Brigham Young University professor Niwako Yamawaki and scholars from Saga University evaluated the mental health of 241 Hirono citizens. More than half of the people evaluated experienced "clinically concerning" symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder. Two-thirds of the sample reported symptoms of depression.
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Safeguarding children in England: primary care needs to 'wake-up' to domestic abuse

Medical News - Mon, 10/03/2014 - 08:00
Researchers looking at how healthcare professionals deal with domestic violence cases have identified that GPs, practice nurses and practice managers are uncertain about how to respond to the exposure of children to domestic violence.With at least 1.2 million women and 784,000 men experiencing domestic violence and abuse in England and Wales each year, the negative effect on families and children can be far-reaching. Childhood exposure to domestic violence and abuse can result in long-term behavioural, mental health and education problems.
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New insight into key biological processes offered by computational tool

Medical News - Mon, 10/03/2014 - 08:00
Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed a computational tool designed to guide future research on biochemical pathways by identifying which components in a biological system are related to specific biochemical processes, including those processes responsible for gene expression, cell signaling, stress response, and metabolism."Our goal was to identify modules, or functional units, which are critical to the performance of the biochemical pathways that govern a host of biological processes," says Dr.
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Motion prolongs survival whilst waiting for a donor heart

Medical News - Mon, 10/03/2014 - 08:00
For many people with advanced cardiac insufficiency, a heart transplant may be their only hope. But waiting for a donor heart to come along is a race against time. Patients who remain active and stay in good shape psychologically can significantly increase their chances of surviving this period. Anxiety-ridden, depressive and passive patients, on the other hand, run the risk of further serious deterioration of their heart's ability to function.
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Genetic diagnostics to prevent sudden cardiac death

Medical News - Mon, 10/03/2014 - 08:00
The genetic disease ARVC leads to sudden cardiac death and is more common than it has been hitherto assumed. This is reported by an international team of researchers headed by Prof Dr Hendrik Milting from the Heart and Diabetes Center NRW in the "European Heart Journal". The molecular biologist working at the Ruhr-Universitat's clinic in Bad Oeynhausen revealed that all families who are known to be affected by the disease share the same genetic origin. There must be other families in Europe who also carry the genetic mutation but who are not yet known.
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Higher levels of omega-3 in diet associated with better sleep

Medical News - Mon, 10/03/2014 - 08:00
A randomised placebo-controlled study by the University of Oxford suggests that higher levels of omega-3 DHA, the group of long-chain fatty acids found in algae and seafood, are associated with better sleep. The researchers explored whether 16 weeks of daily 600 mg supplements of algal sources would improve the sleep of 362 children. The children who took part in the study were not selected for sleep problems, but were all struggling readers at a mainstream primary school.
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