Feed aggregator

Tooth loss linked to depression and anxiety

Medical News - Tue, 25/03/2014 - 08:00
At the 43rd Annual Meeting & Exhibition of the American Association for Dental Research (AADR), held in conjunction with the 38th Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research, R. Constance Wiener, from West Virginia University, Morgantown, presented a research study titled "Association of Tooth Loss and Depression and Anxiety."Tooth loss from caries and periodontal disease is an outcome from complex, chronic conditions. Several biopsychosocial factors are involved, including accessing care.
Categories: BioFind News

Parents can pass on their bad habits to their children

Medical News - Tue, 25/03/2014 - 08:00
Parents who use alcohol, marijuana, and drugs have higher frequencies of children who pick up their habits, according to a study from Sam Houston State University.The study, "Intergenerational Continuity of Substance Use," found that when compared to parents who did not use substances, parents who used alcohol, marijuana, and other illicit drugs were significantly more likely to have children who used those same drugs.
Categories: BioFind News

Natural-products derivatives to inhibit oral biofilm and cell-cell communication

Medical News - Tue, 25/03/2014 - 08:00
During the 43rd Annual Meeting & Exhibition of the American Association for Dental Research, held in conjunction with the 38th Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research, Steve Kasper, SUNY College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, Albany, presented research titled "Inhibition of Oral Biofilm and Cell-cell Communication Using Natural-products Derivatives."Many plant metabolites and structurally similar derivatives have been identified as inhibitors of bacterial biofilm formation and quorum sensing (QS).
Categories: BioFind News

Enhancing detection of infectious disease biomarkers using shrink wrap

Medical News - Tue, 25/03/2014 - 08:00
New technique uses wrinkles in metal-coated shrink wrap to boost biomarkers' signals a thousand-fold, paving the way for a low-cost, highly sensitive diagnostic deviceDetecting HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria and other deadly infectious diseases as early as possible helps to prevent their rapid spread and allows for more effective treatments. But current detection methods are cost-prohibitive in most areas of the world. Now a new nanotechnology method - employing common, everyday shrink wrap - may make highly sensitive, extremely low-cost diagnosis of infectious disease agents possible.
Categories: BioFind News

Study explores connection between ideology, social capital and health

Medical News - Tue, 25/03/2014 - 08:00
The nation's left-leaning citizens might be pleased by the findings of a new University of Nebraska study that finds those who live in liberal states tend to be healthier.But conservatives could also take satisfaction in the same study's conclusion that strong communities also foster better health."Some people might like the argument that liberal government automatically leads to healthier people, because it supports their worldview," said Mitchel Herian, a faculty fellow with the university's Public Policy Center and lead researcher on the new study.
Categories: BioFind News

Researchers find source of earliest blood cells during development

Medical News - Tue, 25/03/2014 - 08:00
Hematopoietic stem cells are now routinely used to treat patients with cancers and other disorders of the blood and immune systems, but researchers knew little about the progenitor cells that give rise to them during embryonic development.
Categories: BioFind News

Scientists find surprising new way to kill cancer cells

Medical News - Tue, 25/03/2014 - 08:00
Northwestern Medicine scientists have demonstrated that cancer cells - and not normal cells - can be killed by eliminating either the FAS receptor, also known as CD95, or its binding component, CD95 ligand."The discovery seems counterintuitive because CD95 has previously been defined as a tumor suppressor," said lead investigator Marcus Peter, professor in medicine-hematology/Oncology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. "But when we removed it from cancer cells, rather than proliferate, they died."The findings were published in Cell Reports.
Categories: BioFind News

Poor fuel economy in the muscles may help lean people stay that way

Medical News - Tue, 25/03/2014 - 08:00
We all know the type: the friend or colleague who stays slim and trim without much effort and despite eating the same high-calorie fare that causes everyone else to gain weight. As it turns out, the way the muscles of the inherently thin work may give them the edge.Daily physical activity is an inherited trait with a strong association to how fat or thin a person is. Chaitanya K. Gavini et al. previously found that aerobic capacity is a major predictor of daily physical activity level among humans and laboratory animals.
Categories: BioFind News

Genome-wide association studies mislead on cardiac arrhythmia risk gene

Medical News - Tue, 25/03/2014 - 08:00
Although genome-wide association studies have linked DNA variants in the gene SCN10A with increased risk for cardiac arrhythmia, efforts to determine the gene's direct influence on the heart's electrical activity have been unproductive. Now, scientists from the University of Chicago have discovered that these SCN10A variants regulate the function of a different gene, SCN5A, which appears to be the primary gene responsible for cardiac arrhythmia risk. The SCN10A gene itself plays only a minimal role in the heart, according to the study, published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.
Categories: BioFind News

Renewed promise for potential lung cancer vaccine

Medical News - Tue, 25/03/2014 - 08:00
Researchers at UC Davis have found that the investigational cancer vaccine tecemotide, when administered with the chemotherapeutic cisplatin, boosted immune response and reduced the number of tumors in mice with lung cancer. The study also found that radiation treatments did not significantly impair the immune response. The paper was published in the journal Cancer Immunology Research, an American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) publication.
Categories: BioFind News

Physical activity and diet have positive impact on health, regardless of fat levels

Medical News - Tue, 25/03/2014 - 08:00
Digits on a scale can help determine a child's weight, but their overall health status can be influenced by other factors such as physical activity, diet and screen time, according to new research from the University of Alberta and Alberta Health Services.A study of 181 children with obesity aged eight to seventeen years old showed that up to a third could be classified as "metabolically healthy," meaning they're not imminently at risk of developing insulin resistance - a precursor to Type 2 diabetes - high blood pressure, high cholesterol or other obesity-related diseases.
Categories: BioFind News

Stem cell findings advance efforts to reprogram mature cells for organ repair

Medical News - Tue, 25/03/2014 - 08:00
Two proteins that control how cells break down glucose play a key role in forming human stem cells, University of Washington researchers have found. The finding has implications for future work in both regenerative medicine and cancer therapy.A report on this research appears online March 20 in the Cell journal Stem Cell. The paper's lead authors are Julie Mathieu, a postdoctoral fellow at the UW, and Wenyu Zhou, a former graduate student at UW and now a postdoctoral scholar at Stanford University. Hannele Ruohola-Baker, UW professor of biochemistry, is the paper's senior author.
Categories: BioFind News

As brain images become increasingly important, special report examines what they can - and cannot - tell us about ourselves

Medical News - Tue, 25/03/2014 - 08:00
Neuroimages play a growing role in biomedical research, medicine, and courtrooms, as well as in shaping our understanding of what it means to be human. But how helpful are they at answering complex questions such as: What is depression? Is a defendant lying? Do we have free will?These are among the topics explored in Interpreting Neuroimages: An Introduction to the Technology and Its Limits, a special report of the Hastings Center Report.
Categories: BioFind News

Association discovered between severity of autism symptoms and gene family linked to brain evolution

Medical News - Tue, 25/03/2014 - 08:00
The same gene family that may have helped the human brain become larger and more complex than in any other animal is also linked to the severity of autism, according to new research from the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.The gene family is made up of over 270 copies of a segment of DNA called DUF1220. DUF1220 codes for a protein domain - a specific functionally important segment within a protein. The more copies of a specific DUF1220 subtype a person with autism has, the more severe the symptoms, according to a paper published in the PLoS Genetics.
Categories: BioFind News

Novel pro-resolving-medicines in periodontal regeneration

Medical News - Tue, 25/03/2014 - 08:00
During the 43rd Annual Meeting & Exhibition of the American Association for Dental Research, held in conjunction with the 38th Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research, Daniel Huy Nguyen, The Forsyth Institute, Cambridge, Mass., presented research titled "Novel Pro-Resolving-Medicines in Periodontal Regeneration."Uncontrolled host defense mechanisms can significantly impede tissue engineering, regeneration and reconstruction of oral and craniofacial tissues.
Categories: BioFind News

Gingivitis: salivary biomarkers supply information important for personalized decision-making

Medical News - Tue, 25/03/2014 - 08:00
During the 43rd Annual Meeting & Exhibition of the American Association for Dental Research, held in conjunction with the 38th Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research, Craig Miller, University of Kentucky, Lexington, will present research titled "Salivary Biomarkers of Gingivitis: Information Important for Personalized Decision-Making."Salivary biomarkers have been studied to help determine the presence, risk, and progression of periodontal disease.
Categories: BioFind News

A higher incidence of forgetfulness likely due to genetic variation

Medical News - Tue, 25/03/2014 - 08:00
Misplaced your keys? Can't remember someone's name? Didn't notice the stop sign? Those who frequently experience such cognitive lapses now have an explanation. Psychologists from the University of Bonn have found a connection between such everyday lapses and the DRD2 gene. Those who have a certain variant of this gene are more easily distracted and experience a significantly higher incidence of lapses due to a lack of attention. The scientific team will probably report their results in the May issue of "Neuroscience Letters," which is already available online in advance.
Categories: BioFind News

Researchers trace deadly bacteria in cheese

Medical News - Tue, 25/03/2014 - 08:00
If food products are not produced in a hygienic environment, consumers can face the threat of dangerous pathogens. This is exactly what happened in 2009 and 2010 when two different strains of Listeria monocytogenes were found in the traditional Austrian curd cheese known as "Quargel". 34 people were infected, and a total of 8 patients died. Experts from the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna analysed the genomes of the outbreak strains and were able to show that the strains displayed distinct properties and entered the food chain independently.
Categories: BioFind News

Global burden of disability highest for low back pain

Medical News - Tue, 25/03/2014 - 08:00
Many of us experience low back pain at some point in our lives for different reasons. And now, new research suggests this condition causes more disability worldwide than any other ailment.The researchers behind the study - who publish their results in the journal Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases - say that, as life expectancies increase and the proportion of elderly people rises, this problem will worsen in the coming decades.As such, the team warns governments and health services to take the issue more seriously than they have in the past.
Categories: BioFind News

E-cigarettes 'should not be marketed as smoking cessation aids'

Medical News - Tue, 25/03/2014 - 08:00
The debate over the benefits and potential harms of e-cigarettes has raged on across the media in recent months. Now, research published in JAMA Internal Medicine finds that there is no association between e-cigarette use and reduced cigarette consumption.Medical News Today recently ran a spotlight feature summarizing the controversies surrounding electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) - the popular cigarette substitutes that are often marketed as a smoking cessation tool. In that piece, Dr. Maciej L.
Categories: BioFind News